Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore
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Lake Superior: Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore

on
October 21, 2019

Touring Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore
☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆

A sea kayaking experience that’s truly a must-do for just about any paddler, the Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore is an exquisite area of rugged beauty with sheer sandstone cliffs 200′ high streaked with colorful mineral deposits for miles on end, some with huge arches, quaint coves, nook-and-cranny caves and massive slabs of rock as big as a house beneath the cool jewel of translucent water.

Date:
August 31, 2019

Skill Level: Beginner/Intermediate
Class Difficulty: Great Lakes Paddling

A quick disclaimer about skill levels: This trip was done with an outfitter/tour guide, who is trained in open-water rescue. That’s why we’re stating it as Beginner/Intermediate. If you wish to paddle Lake Superior on your own, or with a small group of friends, you (or one of your friends) will need to be skilled and experienced – especially on big open water the likes of Lake Superior, whose temperature is hypothermia-inducing and whose climate is notorious for sporadic shifts and temperamental tantrums. Paddlers need the right boat, the right gear, and the right know-how (including the wisdom of staying off the water if there’s even a chance that things go south when you’re up north). Half of the coast at Pictured Rocks is composed of cliffs directly lining the shoreline with no accessibility whatsoever for miles on end. Lake Superior is an awesome place to paddle, but it first demands the utmost caution and consideration.

Gradient:
n/a

Gauge:
n/a

Recommended Levels:
n/a

Put-In + Take-Out:
Pictured Rocks Kayaking outfitter, Munising, Michigan

Time: Put in at 2:10p. Out at 5:40p.
Total Time: 2h 30m
Miles Paddled: 5

Wildlife: One peregrine falcon, a score of crows and/or ravens and a gazillion seagulls.

Background:
For the uninitiated, Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore is, for all intents and purposes, a national park along Lake Superior’s southern coast in the U.P. in between the towns of Munising and Grand Marais. (It’s technically not a national park, but rather national lakeshore. And yet it…

A) is staffed by national parks folks,

B) has the same national parks signs with the iconic brown-and-green arrowheads marking scenic spots, trailheads and general areas of interest, and

C) features the same amount of very limited roads (most of them narrow and winding) that connect any two points in the park, all with very slow drivers or stupidly fast drivers or a gazillion ginormous motor homes that hog 2/3 of the available lane space and parking stalls in the lots. But I digress.)

Stretching for some 42 miles and comprising over 73,000 acres, Pictured Rocks is a majestic place – with 200′-tall cliffs on one side and 400′-tall sand dunes on the other, where in between there’s a baker’s dozen stunning waterfalls, wetlands, wilderness areas, boreal forests and lakes, canyons, campgrounds and hiking areas (including the mighty North Country Trail).

Purists may scoff, and perhaps there’s a better analogy I’m not thinking of or just haven’t visited yet, but for me Pictured Rocks is like the Yellowstone of the Midwest: it’s huge and abundant, with incredible diversity and eye-popping phenomena, and very popular (i.e., crowded and congested in some areas at some times of the day). But I offer that for the sake of context. If comparisons are condescending, then let me just assert that Pictured Rocks is boldly its own place entirely, and one of the most majestic anywhere in America (not just the Upper Midwest or Great Lakes region). Take that, Jackson Hole.

I (Timothy) first visited Pictured Rocks in May 2010, to kayak along the cliffs and coast, and also hike/camp. It was an experience both mesmerizing and memorable, one I’ve wanted to rekindle – and a sacred place I’ve wanted to reconnect to – ever since. The whole area is simply spectacular – I’ve never seen or been to anything quite like it before. It’s similar to the sea caves on the Bayfield Peninsula in Wisconsin, but more majestic. It’s also similar to the Dells on the Wisconsin River, but wilder and more exotic since it’s open-water paddling on Lake Superior. (Alas, like the Wisconsin Dells paddle, you’ll be sharing the water with lots of tour boats, many of which advance with loud tour guides blah-blah-blah’ing about this and that bit of colloquial folklore, together with comfortably seated tourists sipping drinks and waving at you, and then retreat with a wave-riddled wake you’ll need to be mindful of.)

Since 2013, I’ve been fortunate enough to be invited to and/or coordinate a Labor Day weekend adventure combining paddling and camping somewhere more or less exotic in Wisconsin, always a different location each year. While the cast of characters has changed with each trip, there’s typically been a common core year after year. Like any good tradition, it happened naturally, with no intention or forced effort, and grew into its own fruition. The places and experiences have ranged from lazy overnight trips on the lower Black River while camping on sandbars to day trips paddling Class II rapids on the Wolf River and suffering through one of the most obnoxious campgrounds ever endured. In 2017 the master plan imploded after schedule conflicts and other complications. Similarly, last year, the unfavorable weather forecast led folks to folding at the last minute. But this year we got back on track, with an emphasis more on camping than paddling (bizarre, I know, but it made sense), and the proposal was Pictured Rocks.

That our trip coincided with the gone-viral video of a rock collapse only a couple weeks beforehand was pure serendipity.

The only catch, however, is once you start poring over maps – for paddling purposes – you’ll start scratching your head over logistics. Because this is coastal paddling, a kayaker has two trip options: to put in at Point A and paddle to Point B, either taking-out there for a point-to-point journey, or to backtrack to Point A. The former is more fun, in my opinion, and allows a paddler to explore more of the scenery, but it does require shuttling – and in Pictured Rocks, shuttling is no simple feat. Given the volume of vehicles on the main roads, the park is a far cry from ideal for bicycling. Furthermore, the accesses along the coast are literally few and far between, some of them necessitating impractically/implausibly long carry-outs from 1.5 to 3 miles from shore to parking area. That’s a long way to schlep a long boat and gear! As such, most paddlers opt for the latter type of trip – paddling along the coast to such-and-such a spot, breaking for lunch probably, then turning back around to where they initially began. Logistically, this is much easier, of course, but A) you end up seeing everything you’ve already seen up to that point (not necessarily a bad thing, given the insane beauty of the place, but still) and B) it limits how far one can/should venture, as however many miles you paddle in one direction will be doubled in order to return to the starting point.

When I first paddled Pictured Rocks, in 2010, I launched from Miners Beach, paddled to Mosquito Beach 4 miles upcoast, got out on the sand to stretch and be a landlubber, then got back in my boat to return to Miners Beach. All in all, an 8-mile trip, although I saw only 4 miles of the whole park. It was sensational, but it hardly sated my hungered curiosity to see more.

This time around, a wholly new, wholly unprecedented idea was put on the table: paddle Pictured Rocks with a touring outfitter. The touring outfitter transports you (and about 30 others) via a big boat to Lake Superior itself, whereupon you launch your kayak from the big boat directly into the big lake, thereby beginning your trip smack-dab in one of the most jaw-dropping areas of the shoreline (like the proverbial joke of being born on third base but feeling like you hit a triple). The deal is this: you board in Munising, then get ferried across some of the more mundane stretches of shoreline for about 15 miles, get dropped off on the lake to begin a 5-mile/2.5-hour-long paddle from Mosquito Beach to Chapel Rock (or vice versa, depending on the direction of the wind at the time), then hop back on the big boat that returns to Munising, where you have only to drop off your paddle and PFD and then saunter to your car (and/or change clothes). No schlepping of long sea kayaks, no strapping down boats on your car, no nothing. Easy-peasy and on your way again. The outfitter does all the work.

I don’t mind admitting the following: originally, this was not my idea, and initially, I was opposed to it. First off, I’m not a tour guide kind of guy – for anything or anywhere (museums, ancient ruins, breweries). Secondly, I’m a frugal guy, and the cost for the tour is $150 per person. After taxes, that’s pretty much two 8-hour days of work for me. My friends – who make a lot more money than I do – proposed this quite matter of factly, which, for the record, is 100% eminently sensible and supremely practical. They don’t own sea kayaks, or dry suits, or have rescue skills in the event of a spontaneous storm. Bear in mind: there are several stretches along the shore where there is no access whatsoever for miles on end, in the event of sudden weather. And Lake Superior is prone to such, um, “spontaneity” (how’s that for a euphemism?) So, given those factors plus the highly persuasive bonus of no shuttling or schlepping, that’s how the tour group idea was born.

My own reactionary idea was this: Cool! Sounds good. But how’s about we drop my car off on one end, then shuttle me and boat to Miners Beach, and drop me off? Y’all continue on down to Munising and hop on the big boat as planned. In the meanwhile, I’ll paddle up to Mosquito Beach alone but then rendezvous with y’all, then paddle together for five miles up to Chapel Rock, then continue on my own past Spray Falls (which seems insane to miss) to Big Star Cove and the beach near Beaver Creek and a 1.5-mile trail back to my car. That would have made for an epic 12-ish mile paddle, and free. And I reasoned that in the amount of time it would take them to drive to/fro Munising and all that, I could be busy doing my own thing. But, for a variety of reasons I won’t bore you with, that just didn’t happen.

So, instead I stuck with the original plan and shut my pie-hole. And boy oh boy am I glad that I did! The trip was truly wonderful.

Overview:
Before discovering the true headwaters of the Mississippi River, the eminent explorer, Henry Rowe Schoolcraft, described the Pictured Rocks area with the following effusive flourish:

“We had been told of the variety of the colour and form of these rocks, but were wholly unprepared to encounter surprising groups of overhanging precipices, towering walls, caverns, and waterfalls mingled in the most wonderful disorder.”

Or at least such is credited to him in Guide to Sea Kayaking Lakes Superior & Michigan, by Bill Newman, Sarah Ohmann, and Don Dimond. But I love that line – “mingled in the most wonderful disorder.”

The most popular draw to the park are the rock formations after which it is named. The eponymous rocks are sandstone, which are porous and allow water and sediments to seep through. Minerals that have filtered through the sandstone then percolate outward via groundwater and streak the rock facades with colorful décor the like of reds and oranges (wrought by iron), blues and greens (courtesy of copper – like old pennies or pipes), white (brought to you by limonite – I had to look that one up), and black (that would be manganese, which is as hard to correctly pronounce or spell, but is a fun word nonetheless). Sure, there are some stretches of shoreline where the colors in the cliffs are more captivating and vivid than others; but, generally speaking, it should be taken for granted that virtually all of this trip will feature Crayola-worthy kayaking.

Sandstone is not only permeable, but fragile and prone to erosion. Sometimes the huge chunks and curtains of rock break off (like in that video), while other times turrets, spires, coves, vortexes and natural bridge arches also result from the incessant sculpting of wind and waves. While shaped by destruction, the results are spectacularly creative!

While I’m tempted to just launch right into the trip description, it behooves me to explain the outfitter’s logistics and a quick experience of things, since this was such a departure from our modus operandi. We reserved spaces for the 2pm trip and, like everyone else in our group, met at the outfitter’s headquarters, whereupon the staff explained what we’d be doing, where going, and some basic ABC stuff about kayaks and kayaking. Everyone was paired with another to share a tandem Necky Looksha T, more rec kayak than sea kayak, but practically indestructible.

We then all got aboard a kind of small cruise vessel (aka the “big boat”) and then zip out of the Munising harbor at what feels like a hundred knots per hour, past Grand Island on one side and then the gradual drama of the national lakeshore on the other, for about 15 miles. The novelty of the big boat was twofold: all of the kayaks and paddles were stowed on top of the boat on an upper level, and at the back of the boat had a lowered platform on the water surface itself with parallel “gutters” (for lack of a more correct or elegant term) into which two kayaks were placed and soon-to-paddle people got inside before being rolled out and onto the water. It’s a very nifty operation and, honestly, pretty brilliant. I mean, why not start your trip on the water at some of the most scenic areas on Lake Superior? Sure beats shuttling and schlepping! (Privately, I had to chuckle, as it was a safe bet, given the outfits and attitudes of our fellow paddlers on display, that at least half of them had no idea just how easy the outfitter was making this for us, that it’s never this pampered or simple!)

Now, onto the trip itself…

On account of the wind coming in from the north and east, our trip began at the eastern end of the route, at Chapel Rock, then went southwest. Chapel Rock is an iconic example of sandstone’s impermanence. While it once was a uniform part of the cliff, today it has been whittled down to its own stand-alone rock formation – more or less like a classic “sea stack” – that literally is tethered to the mainland by a couple of very long, very thick tree roots that are fully exposed, thanks to the one tragically isolated tree atop the rock. And while you’ll find Chapel Rock engraved on the new Michigan quarter, you’d need a lot of them to pay the fine for tightrope walking on the roots from the mainland to the rock, as the fine is about $300. (Yes, you can thank our tour guide for that fun fact!) Just to the right of Chapel Rock is Chapel Beach, dramatically ushered by a rushing mini-waterfall where Chapel Creek enters Lake Superior by a scalloped ledge about 30′ wide. You might say the key word is “chapel.” (Note: this small waterfall at the mouth of the creek is not the same as the better known, and much bigger, Chapel Falls, a few miles farther upstream and part of the most popular day hike in the park.)

Before moving on and away from all things “Chapel,” we tucked into a quaint but not less magnificent cove just past the beach, where as you look above the overhanging brick-red sandstone juxtaposed with the green sheen of pine-lined cliffs and that sky- blue sky* that permeates a sense of Pure Michigan, the whole effect is of a vaulted cathedral ceiling that is indeed most holy. It’s all just stupefying and spectacularly magnificent – which can be liberally applied to this whole trip and whole lakeshore of Pictured Rocks itself.

* I know, you were thinking I’d plug the Wilco song by that name from the album of that name, which is one of my favorites, but the song from that album that invokes the sun-washed clean feeling I have in mind is the lead off song, “Either Way,” especially the gorgeous warm tones of the guitar solo at 1:47.

As you move down the coastline your eyes will play tricks on you. What you swear is an arch is rather an indented grotto that looks like a massive fist (or wave) punched in a paper bag. What you swear are impenetrable rocks suddenly reveal themselves to be navigable, depending on the timing of water, wind, and wave ebbing and flowing. What you swear is only 50′ high is actually 200′, and when you’re told that the cliff overhead is in fact 200′ tall, you’d swear on your soul that it’s 1000′. One mascara-streaked mineral-seeped wall resembles another, making you wonder if you’re paddling forwards or backwards – it’s all open water on the inland sea of Lake Superior. On and on. The whole effect is positively mesmerizing!

The next exceptional highlight (because, really, everything here is a highlight – and exceptional, to be perfectly honest – but I’ll try to keep this rudder in-line with our trip) is called Grand Portal Arch. Prior to entropy, this was an enormous arch that sailing ships could easily slip under, as it’s at least 60 feet tall. But sections of rock have twice collapsed in the last century into a pile of rock-rubble half the height of the arch itself. Today, it’s a huge mound that has become repurposed as a seagull colony.

Actually, that’s not really the “next” highlight – at least not right away. You’ll see it from a distance, and the eye is certainly drawn to it like a flame-ward moth. But prior to that is a mini cave that can be paddled through. It’s very short – and low-clearance – but it’s a very fun effect. The lake will need to be relatively calm to do this, otherwise you’d bob up and down too tumultuously for this to be safe (or even feasible).

Then, you come up to Grand Portal Arch. And as a kind of consolation hybrid prize, just to the right of the rubble pile is a small(er) mini cave-arch you can paddle through. Just be sure to time the wave cycle correctly in order to navigate through without getting pushed into any of the rocks!

A quarter-mile past that is the prominent landmark of Indianhead/Grand Portal Point, a promontory jutting out into the lake that, looking at it from the southwest, more or less resembles a human caricature in profile with headdress. Whether you care to anthropomorphize the rock outcrop, it is indisputably a notable fixture. I mean, seriously, it’s humongous.

Moving southwest still, you’ll paddle past fallen blocks of rocks as big as a garage tumbled over like playing dice for giants. At the risk of sounding redundant, you’ll be reminded of the sheer size of scale out here. I mean, of course, it all makes sense: why wouldn’t the largest freshwater lake on the planet (by surface area) be girded by a shoreline as dramatic and grandiose? But whereas the immensity of Lake Superior itself is all but unimaginable – it contains enough water to cover all of North and South America under one full foot of water (seriously, just spend a minute contemplating that) – at least the cliffs and fallen rocks are easier to appreciate… but still phenomenal!

Rainbow Cave comes next. To be fair, it’s as much a cove as it is a cave, but let’s not mince words (or vowels). It’s a huge overhang that features reliably trickling water percolating downwards. On sunny days those droplets can be substantial enough to create a small rainbow curtain at the right time of day in the right time of light. We did not make the good acquaintance of Mr. Roy G. Biv, but just the sprinkle effect was fun enough. Plus, the rock colors inside the cave-cove are the most flamboyant and spirit-lifting anywhere on this trip, featuring wet, loud tropical greens and creams and luscious toothpaste-hued blues.

There’s one final highlight on the trip in terms of oohs and ahs. That’s Lovers Leap, an enormous arch that hasn’t collapsed (yet) and can be paddled through. It’s an extraordinary portal and an incredible experience the likes of which… well, it’s unprecedented for little old me at least. There’s a good chance you’ve seen this arch on Michigan tourism ads. But of course, they don’t capture what it’s like to be on the water in person.

As a denouement of sorts, just past Lovers Leap is the far less PG-named “Caves of the Bloody Chiefs.” They’re a succession of gorgeous recesses at the water’s edge. I’m not sure how apocryphal this is, but we were told that prisoners of war were stockaded in these water-bound caves by native tribes. Skepticism aside, I think the tour could have skipped the narrative bits here and just let us admire the cool “cavities” at the base of the cliffs, if only because there wasn’t a whole lot more to the tour after that. Mosquito Beach does appear after this – the next/only land access since Chapel Beach. Like Chapel, there’s a small waterfall ledge at the mouth of the creek. And, like Chapel Beach, you’ll likely see folks and families along the sand here.

After this we bee-lined back to the big boat, lined up into the gangplank-like slots, and exited. After we all boarded, the big boat pulled around and headed back to Munising.

What we liked:
It’s everything, the cumulative experience of it all. There’s the sheer scale of the landscape: the whole world is just gargantuan. The jade green/translucent hues of Lake Superior’s water mimicking the Caribbean is simply breathtaking. It’s an inland sea, pure and simple (minus the salt and sharks). Yet the surreal palette of colo[u]rs is, dare I say it, True North. It’s northcountry up here, an utterly awesome reckoning when you think of how cold this part of the country gets in winter, or how short its spring, or how impetuously tempestuous its day-to-day nature the big lake is. Consider: only 24 hours before our trip there was a small boat advisory in Munising on account of 30+ mph winds and 3′ waves. But on the day of our paddle, it was easy breezy indeed.

But as I mentioned earlier, it’s namely the rock formations that draw visitors to the area (including us). Caves, coves, arches, turrets – fallen, upright – they’re everywhere, and they’re simply magnificent. Further enhancing it all are all the colors, steep facades streaked with colorful mascara runs. It’s hard to imagine a place as aesthetic as Pictured Rocks.

And I would be stubborn and irresponsible to omit the indisputable convenience of doing this trip with Pictured Rocks Kayaking. Honestly, they provide a great service and have selected a premier slice that the national shoreline has to offer. We got a lot out of our personal tour guide and were ever so thankful for the ease of this trip. You basically get the best out of an official tour boat guide with an actual paddle on the water. It’s a unique experience that we loved.

What we didn’t like:
There’s no point in pointing out the obvious things – group paddling with a tour guide or forking over $150 to do so – because that would be totally missing the point. This trip only exists on account of a touring outfitter, and the cost of doing business (and paying for insurance liability, given the inherent risk of paddling Lake Superior) is completely understandable and justifiable. Besides, those so-called “obvious things” are strictly relative being a river paddler who is used to doing my own thing, going my own way, and doing so for free (well, unless I’m in Minnesota). This trip was a whole new ballpark, so to speak. Ergo, it would be absurd to bellyache about things I’m not used to doing that are neither here nor there for a separate enterprise of a trip.

The only thing I didn’t like, in all honesty, was to miss Spray Falls. Considering that it’s only 1.5 miles east of Chapel Rock, and that we were paddling only 5 miles from Chapel Rock to Mosquito Beach, it didn’t seem like an inconvenience to include that on the itinerary. After all, it is a 70’-tall waterfall plunging from the top of a cliff, out of boreal forests, straight into Lake Superior itself… I mean, come on! It’s like something you’d expect to see in New Zealand or British Columbia! How is that not included in the best of the best?

But I do understand the technical logistics that would have to be added to include that on such a trip for an outfitter, and at the end of the day concessions have to be made and some things just skipped. You can’t see all of Pictured Rocks in a day – you just can’t.

If we did this trip again:
As stubbornly reluctant as I was about yoking myself to a tour group, let alone the cost of such a venture, it ended up being a very good experience whose practicalities cannot be casually dismissed. At the risk of sounding like a Yelp review, I’d definitely recommend this to others. But I first paddled Pictured Rocks by myself, and I’d sooner do that again (well, not necessarily a solo trip – which really isn’t advised unless you are an inveterate sea kayaker with ample and proper safety gear and have honed-in self-rescue skills – but not with an official tour group). And part of that next trip will include Spray Falls, because being so close to a waterfall that cascades off a cliff into Lake Superior but not being right there is kind of like driving past Multnomah Falls on I-84 and missing it: it’s just wrong, plain wrong.

Regardless, I recommend doing this trip off-season and/or on a weekday, as opposed to a weekend (let alone a three-day holiday weekend) for the sake of more solitude and less congestion. And, ideally, in the late afternoon, paddling eastward, to get the best effects of the sun burnishing the richest hues from the rocks and water.

***************
Related Information:
General: Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore
Camp: Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore
Maps: National Parks Service info
Outfitter: Pictured Rocks Kayaking
Wikipedia: Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore

Map:


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Bois Brule River IV
9.4.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Highway 13 to Lake Superior

Bois Brule River III
9.3.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Copper Range Landing to Highway 13

Bois Brule River II
9.6.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Bois Brule Landing to Copper Range Landing

Bois Brule River I
9.2.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Stone’s Bridge Landing to Bois Brule Landing

Boundary Waters (MN)

Boundary Waters: Kawishiwi River
7.2-7.8.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Kawishiwi Lake to Lake One

Cannon River (MN)

Cannon River II
8.25.19 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Cannon Falls to Welch

Cannon River I
5.31.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Faribault to Dundas

Carroll Creek (IL)

Carroll Creek
6.21.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
4.26.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Point Rock Park to Jacobstown Road

Catfish Creek (IA)

Catfish Creek
5.7.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Mines of Spain to Massey Marina Park

Cedar Creek

Cedar Creek
9.28.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆
County Road M to Cedarburg

Cherokee Marsh

Cherokee Marsh
7.27.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Madison, Wisconsin

Chicago River (IL)

Chicago River
7.14.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Chicago, Illinois

Coon Fork Creek

Coon Fork Creek
5.30.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
County Road CF to County Road G

Covel Creek (IL)

Covel Creek
6.18.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
East 18th Road to Highway 71

Crawfish River

Crawfish River III
4.17.16 | ☆ ☆
County Road I to County Road G

Crawfish River II
3.21.15 | ☆ ☆
Olson Road to Aztalan State Park

Crawfish River I
9.16.11 | ☆
Milford to Jefferson

Crawfish River: North Branch

Crawfish River: North Branch
6.8.15 & 6.10.15 | ☆ ☆
Fall River to Columbus-Fall River Road

Crystal River

Crystal River Overview
Our Guide to the Crystal River

Crystal River III
6.1.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Little Hope to Shadow Lake

Crystal River II
4.11.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Marl Lake to Shadow Lake Road

Crystal River I
7.8.12 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
9.10.11 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Rural to Shadow Lake Road

Dell Creek

Dell Creek
3.15.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆
South Avenue to Dellwood

Devil’s Lake

Devil’s Lake
10.20.19 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Devil’s Lake State Park

Door Creek

Door Creek
4.1.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Femrite Drive to Fish Camp County Park

Duck Creek

Duck Creek
3.23.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆
County Road G to Duck Creek Road

Eau Claire River (Douglas County)

Eau Claire River (Douglas)
7.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Middle Eau Claire Lake to Gordon

Eau Claire River (Eau Claire County)

Eau Claire River II (Eau Claire)
5.29.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Harstad County Park to County Road K

Eau Claire River I (Eau Claire)
5.28.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Lake Altoona Dam to Hobbs Landing

Eau Claire River (Marathon County)

Eau Claire River II (Marathon)
7.22.19 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Dells of the Eau Claire Park to Club House Road

Eau Claire River I (Marathon)
6.16.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Bear Lake Road to Dells of the Eau Claire Park

Eau Galle River

Eau Galle River
8.10.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Spring Valley to 770th Avenue

Embarrass River

Embarrass River
8.25.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Highway 45 to County Road M

Flambeau River: North Fork

Flambeau River: North Fork III
7.4-7.5.18 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Highway W Landing to Flambeau Lodge Landing

Flambeau River: North Fork II
7.22.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Nine Mile Creek to Oxbo

Flambeau River: North Fork I
8.17.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Robinson Landing to Holt’s Landing

Fond Du Lac River: West Branch

Fond Du Lac River: West Branch
6.25.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Highway 23 to Lake Winnebago

Fox River

Fox River II
4.30.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
County Road O to Endeavor

Fox River I
5.14.14 | ☆ ☆
Swan Lake to Portage Canal

Fox River (IL)

Fox River
8.21.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Serena to Wedron

Galena/Fever River

Galena/Fever River IV
11.1.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Twin Bridge Road to Bean Street Road

Galena/Fever River III
6.21.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Horseshoe Bend Road to Buncombe Road

Galena/Fever River II
4.28.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Ensche Road to Buckhill Road

Galena/Fever River I
5.24.09 | ☆ ☆ ☆
County Road W to Ensche Road

Grand River

Grand River
5.22.15 | ☆ ☆
Manchester to Kingston

Grant River

Grant River II
4.24.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
11.21.12 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
County Road U to Chaffie Hollow Road

Grant River I
4.23.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
5.23.09 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Short Cut Road to County Road U

Halls Creek

Halls Creek II
8.9.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Garage Road to Halls Creek Landing

Halls Creek I
5.6.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
6.28.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Trow Lake Dam to Halls Creek Landing

Honey Creek (Sauk County)

Honey Creek (Sauk)
7.25.14 | ☆ ☆
County Road O to Ferry Bluff Landing

Honey Creek (Walworth County)

Honey Creek (Walworth)
4.16.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Bell School Road to County Road DD

Jump River

Jump River
8.30.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Luke’s Heights Lane to Big Falls County Park

Kickapoo River

Kickapoo River III
8.22.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Landing 4 to Landing 14

Kickapoo River II
9.8.12 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Rockton to LaFarge

Kickapoo River I
9.7-9.8.12 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Ontario to Rockton

Kickapoo River: West Fork

Kickapoo River: West Fork
8.26.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
County Road S to Highway 56

Kinnickinnic River

Kinnickinnic River II
4.29.18 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
River Falls to Kinnickinnic State Park

Kinnickinnic River I
8.11.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
River Falls to County Road F

Kishwaukee River (IL)

Kishwaukee River
6.17.12 | ☆ ☆
Cherry Valley to New Milford

Koshkonong Creek

Koshkonong Creek IV
7.20.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Busseyville to Lake Koshkonong

Koshkonong Creek III
7.15.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Cambridge to Hoopen Road

Koshkonong Creek II
5.5.13 | ☆ ☆
Britzke Road to Hoopen Road

Koshkonong Creek I
2.24.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Cambridge to Rockdale

La Crosse River

La Crosse River III
11.1.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Veterans Memorial County Park to La Crosse

La Crosse River II
9.28.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Highway 108 to Veterans Memorial County Park

La Crosse River I
8.2.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Sparta to Bangor

Lake Columbia

Lake Columbia
2.2.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Dekorra, Wisconsin

Lake Mendota

Lake Mendota: Governor’s Island
12.11.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Madison, Wisconsin

Lake Michigan

Lake Michigan: Horseshoe Island
7.5.19 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Fish Creek, Wisconsin

Lake Michigan: Port Washington
10.20.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Port Washington to Grafton

Lake Michigan: Ellison Bay
9.29.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Sister Bay to Garret Bay

Lake Michigan: Cave Point County Park
8.17.12 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin

Lake Superior

Lake Superior: Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore
8.31.19 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Munising, Michigan

Lake Superior: Sea Caves
8.15.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Bayfield County, Wisconsin

Lake Superior: Houghton Point
8.14.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Bayfield County, Wisconsin

Lake Waubesa

Lake Waubesa Wetlands
5.13.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Madison, Wisconsin

Lemonweir River

Lemonweir River
9.17.13 | ☆ ☆
Lemonweir to Cliff House Road

Little Platte River

Little Platte River II
6.28.18 | ☆ ☆ ☆
County Road O to Banfield Bridge Recreation Area

Little Platte River I
7.23.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
7.6.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Old Lancaster Road to County Road O

Little Sugar River

Little Sugar River
8.8.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Schneeberger Road to Albany

Little Wolf River

Little Wolf River IV
7.25.19 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Big Falls to Highway 110

Little Wolf River III
8.6.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Ness Road to Big Falls

Little Wolf River II
8.25.12 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Wolf River Road to Big Falls

Little Wolf River I
9.11.11 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Manawa to County Road X

Lulu Lake

Lulu Lake
4.28.19 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Eagle, Wisconsin

Lusk Creek (IL)

Lusk Creek
3.30.18 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Saltpeter Cave Crossing to Eddyville Blacktop Road

Manitowoc River

Manitowoc River II
7.15.18 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
County Road S to Manitowoc

Manitowoc River I
7.14.18 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
County Road JJ to County Road S

Maquoketa River: North Fork (IA)

Maquoketa River: North Fork
6.9.18 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Highway D61 to 60th Avenue

Maunesha River

Maunesha River V
4.3.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Marshall to Firemen’s Park

Maunesha River IV
4.5.15 | ☆ ☆
County Road TT to Canal Road

Maunesha River III
5.18.13 | ☆ ☆
Waterloo to Portland

Maunesha River II
6.13.13 | ☆ ☆
5.8.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Elder Lane to Twin Lake Road

Maunesha River I
4.21.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Waterloo Road to Firemen’s Park

Mecan River

Mecan River Overview
Our Guide to the Mecan River

Mecan River IV
6.10.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Dover Avenue to Germania

Mecan River III
6.3-6.4.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Mecan River Springs to 11th Road

Mecan River II
10.26.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Germania to Lock Road

Mecan River I
5.18.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Dakota to Highway 22

Menomonee River

Menomonee River III
9.8.18 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Mayfair Road to Jacobus Park

Menomonee River II
7.27.17 | ☆ ☆
Pilgrim Road to Frontier Park

Menomonee River I
7.3.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Frontier Park to Jacobus Park

Mill Creek (Iowa County)

Mill Creek (Iowa)
6.8.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Loy Road to Highway 23

Mill Creek (Portage County)

Mill Creek (Portage)
10.16.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Robin Lane to West River Drive

Mill Creek (Richland County)

Mill Creek (Richland)
10.29.18 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Crossover Road to Highway 60

Milwaukee River

Milwaukee River VIII
7.2.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Estabrook Park to Bruce Street

Milwaukee River VII
9.29.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
West Bend to Newburg

Milwaukee River VI
9.30.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Fredonia to Grafton

Milwaukee River V
6.20.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Grafton to County Highway T

Milwaukee River IV
7.19.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Kewaskum to Barton

Milwaukee River III
7.27.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Grafton to Thiensville

Milwaukee River II
7.20.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Estabrook Park to Discovery World

Milwaukee River I
6.20.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆
6.24.12 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Newburg to Fredonia

Milwaukee River: East Branch

Milwaukee River: East Branch III
9.27.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Dundee to Mauthe Lake

Milwaukee River: East Branch II
6.16.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
New Fane to Kewaskum

Milwaukee River: East Branch I
6.3.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
New Prospect to New Fane

Mink River

Mink River
8.16.12 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Rowley’s Bay

Mirror Lake

Mirror Lake
10.17.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
5.24.08 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Mirror Lake State Park to Lake Delton

Montello River

Montello River
11.8.16-11.10.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Harrisville to 11th Road

Moon Lake

Moon Lake
6.19.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Montello, Wisconsin

Mormon Creek

Mormon Creek
8.3.14 | ☆ ☆
Mormon Coulee Park to Goose Island County Park

Morrison Creek

Morrison Creek II
5.5.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Cemetery Road to Pettibone Pass

Morrison Creek I
9.19.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Cemetery Road to Morrison Landing

Mukwonago River

Mukwonago River
11.3.15 | ☆ ☆
Mukwonago to Big Bend

Mullet River

Mullet River
10.20.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Plymouth to County Road M

Namekagon River

Namekagon River
7.16-7.19.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
County Road K to Riverside Landing

Neenah Creek

Neenah Creek
4.19.15 | ☆ ☆
County Road EE to Oxford

Nippersink Creek (IL)

Nippersink Creek
11.3.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Richmond to Spring Grove

Oconomowoc River

Oconomowoc River III
6.4.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Monches to Okauchee Lake

Oconomowoc River II
4.8.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Wisconsin Avenue to Fowler Lake Park

Oconomowoc River I
6.25.11 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Concord Road to County Road P

Old Pearl River (LA)

Old Pearl River
4.3.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Crawford Landing Road to Indian Village Road

Onion River

Onion River II
10.11.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆
County Road A to County Road V

Onion River I
9.23.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
County Road V to Sheboygan Falls

Ontonagon River: Middle Branch

Ontonagon River: Middle Branch
8.12.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Watersmeet to Forest Road 5250

Pecatonica River

Pecatonica River V (IL)
11.15.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Pecatonica River Nature Preserve to Trask Bridge Forest Preserve

Pecatonica River IV
5.20.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Mifflin to Jones Branch Road

Pecatonica River III
4.16.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Brownton to Winslow

Pecatonica River II
11.15.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Darlington to Red Rock

Pecatonica River I
6.16.12 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Calamine to Darlington

Pecatonica River: Dodge Branch

Pecatonica River: Dodge Branch
5.13.18 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Sunny Ridge Road to Banner Road

Pecatonica River: East Branch

Pecatonica River: East Branch VII
11.11.18 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Highway 78 to River Road

Pecatonica River: East Branch VI
10.26.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Hollandale to Horseshoe Bend Road

Pecatonica River: East Branch V
5.2.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Woodford to Highway 11

Pecatonica River: East Branch IV
4.11.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Argyle to Blackhawk Memorial County Park

Pecatonica River: East Branch III
3.16.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Highway HK to Hollandale

Pecatonica River: East Branch II
11.19.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Hollandale to Blanchardville

Pecatonica River: East Branch I
9.29.12 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Highway 78 to Argyle

Pecatonica River: Mineral Point Branch

Pecatonica River: Mineral Point Branch II
6.24.18 + 10.14.18 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Lake Ludden to S. Oak Park Road

Pecatonica River: Mineral Point Branch I
7.30.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Oak Park Road to County Road O

Peshekee River (MI)

Peshekee River
8.31.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Peshekee Grade to 3-Mile Mark

Peshtigo River

Peshtigo River
9.2.12 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Burnt Bridge to Goodman Park

Pewaukee River

Pewaukee River
6.16.19 | ☆ ☆
Koepp Park to Bluemound Road

Pigeon River

Pigeon River
12.5.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
County Road J to Lake Michigan

Pine River (Lincoln County)

Pine River (Lincoln)
9.7.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Center Road to County Road W

Pine River (Richland County)

Pine River II (Richland)
5.12.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Krouskop Park to Twin Bluffs Road

Pine River I (Richland)
7.26.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
4.7.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Rockbridge to County Road AA

Piscasaw Creek (IL)

Piscasaw Creek III
4.17.17 | ☆ ☆
Denny Road to Squaw Prairie Road

Piscasaw Creek II
4.12.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Streit Road to Denny Road

Piscasaw Creek I
4.9.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Maxon Road to Streit Road

Platte River

Platte River Overview
Our Guide to the Platte River

Platte River VII
9.23.18 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Coon Hollow Road to Ellenboro

Platte River VI
2.27.18 + 5.4.18 | ☆ ☆ ☆
County Road E to County Road A

Platte River V
3.27.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
County Road A to Platte Road

Platte River IV
10.28.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Big Platte Road to Indian Creek Road

Platte River III
11.10.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Platte Road to Big Platte Road

Platte River II
9.22.12 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Ellenboro to Platte Road

Platte River I
6.19.11 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Ellenboro to County Road B

Plover River

Plover River IV
9.27.19 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Boundary Road to Kristof Road

Plover River III
5.18.19 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Shantytown Road to Jordan Park

Plover River II
9.23.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Esker Road to Bevent Drive

Plover River I
5.17.19 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
5.19.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Jordan Park to Iverson Park

Prairie River

Prairie River II
5.27.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
County Road C to Stange’s Park

Prairie River I
11.17.12 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Haymeadow Creek to Prairie Road

Puchyan River

Puchyan River
04.19.15 | ☆ ☆
County Road J to Huckleberry Road

Red River

Red River
12.9.12 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Gresham to County Road A

Red Cedar River

Red Cedar River II
9.17.18 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Menomonie to Dunnsville

Red Cedar River I
5.30.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Menomonie to Downsville

Robinson Creek

Robinson Creek II
9.14.19 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Kelly Road to West Pine Hill Road

Robinson Creek I
5.7.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
7.8.12 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Old County Road I to Kelly Road

Rock Creek

Rock Creek
3.26.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Lake Mills to Millford

Rock River

Rock River IV
7.16.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Watertown to Johnson Creek

Rock River III
9.27.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Kanow Park to County Road P

Rock River II
9.21.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Janesville to Beloit

Rock River I (IL)
8.4.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Oregon to Dixon

Root River

Root River
8.2.13 | ☆ ☆
5 Mile Road to Horlick Dam

Root River: South Branch (MN)

Root River: South Branch II
8.26.19 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Preston Trailhead Park to Heron Road

Root River: South Branch I
9.20.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Highway 5 to Preston Trailhead Park

Rubicon River

Rubicon River
5.27.15 | ☆ ☆
Saylesville to Neosho

Scuppernong River

Scuppernong River
8.4.19 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Highway 106 to County Road D

Seeley Creek

Seeley Creek
5.4.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Seeley Lake to Hatchery Road

Sheboygan River

Sheboygan River VI
10.12.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
St. Cloud to Sheboygan Broughton Marsh County Park

Sheboygan River V
10.14.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Sheboygan Broughton Marsh County Park to Kiel

Sheboygan River IV
10.13.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Millhome to Johnsonville

Sheboygan River III
10.11.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Johnsonville to Dassow Park

Sheboygan River II
10.19.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Dassow Park to Sheboygan Falls

Sheboygan River I
10.3.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Sheboygan Falls to Lake Michigan

Six Mile Creek

Six Mile Creek
6.7.14 | ☆
Waunakee Village Park to South Woodland Drive

Spring Creek

Spring Creek II
3.4.18 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Lee Road to Veterans Memorial Park

Spring Creek I
4.20.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Fair Street to County Road V

St. Croix River

St. Croix River II
8.11.12 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Osceola to Somerset Landing

St. Croix River I
8.8.10 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
St. Croix Falls to Osceola

Starkweather Creek

Starkweather Creek
6.08 | ☆
Yahara River to Highway 30

Sugar Creek

Sugar Creek II
4.17.17 | ☆
Bowers Road to State Road 120

Sugar Creek I
4.15.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆
County Road ES to Bowers Road

Sugar River

Sugar River Overview
Our Guide to the Sugar River

Upper Sugar River
…………………………………

Sugar River XII
7.24.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆
White Crossing Road to Valley Road

Sugar River X
10.4.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Highway 69 to County Road A

Sugar River IX
3.28.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆
County Road A to Belleville

Sugar River VII
9.14.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Riverside Road to Paoli

Sugar River III
7.22.11 | ☆
Valley Road to Paoli

Sugar River II
7.3.11 | ☆
Paoli to Belleville

Middle Sugar River
…………………………………

Sugar River XI
11.15.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Attica to Albany

Sugar River VI
5.18.14 | ☆ ☆
Albany to Brodhead

Sugar River IV
8.11.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆
County Road X to County Road EE

Sugar River I
6.9.12 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Belleville to County Road X

Lower Sugar River
…………………………………

Sugar River VIII
9.6.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Brodhead to Avon

Sugar River V (IL)
9.14.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Colored Sands Forest Preserve to North Meridian Road

Sugar River: West Branch

Sugar River: West Branch
7.27.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Fritz Road to County Road PB

Token Creek

Token Creek II
4.22.18 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Token Creek Preserve Park to Daentl Road

Token Creek I
5.22.11 | ☆
8.22.09 | ☆ ☆
5.2.09 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Token Creek County Park to Cherokee Park

Tomorrow River

Tomorrow-Waupaca River Overview
Our Guide to the Tomorrow-Waupaca River

Tomorrow River
7.4.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Rolling Hills Road to Amherst

Trappe River

Trappe River
8.2.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
County Road WW to Wisconsin River Road

Trempealeau River

Trempealeau River II
9.27.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Highway 35 to Perrot State Park

Trempealeau River I
8.16.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Whitehall to Independence

Turtle Creek

Turtle Creek Overview
Our Guide to Turtle Creek

Turtle Creek V
3.20.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Fairfield to Sweet-Allyn Park

Turtle Creek IV
6.21.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
School Section Road to O’Riley Road

Turtle Creek III
6.19.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Springs Park to School Section Road

Turtle Creek II
8.30.19 | ☆ ☆ ☆
7.14.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆
O’Riley Road to Sweet-Allyn Park

Turtle Creek I
7.13.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
8.6.11 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Sweet-Allyn Park to Dickop Street

Upper Iowa River (IA)

Upper Iowa River II
5.29.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Kendallville to Bluffton

Upper Iowa River I
5.24.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Chimney Rock Road to Bluffton Road

Waupaca River

Tomorrow-Waupaca River Overview
Our Guide to the Tomorrow-Waupaca River

Waupaca River VI
10.10.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Buchholz Road to County Highway Q

Waupaca River V
9.1.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Riverview Park to Reek Road

Waupaca River IV
6.2.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Weyauwega to Decker Memorial Park

Waupaca River III
10.24.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Amherst to Durrant Road

Waupaca River II
9.22.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆
County Highway DD to County Highway Q

Waupaca River I
4.12.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
7.7.12 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
7.9.11 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
County Highway Q to Brainards Bridge Park

Wausau Whitewater Park

Wausau Whitewater Park
7.13.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Wausau, Wisconsin

Wedges Creek

Wedges Creek II
5.5.19 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
County Road B to Rouse Road

Wedges Creek I
9.20.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Middle Road to Riviera Avenue

White River (Bayfield County)

White River (Bayfield)
8.16.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Maple Ridge Road to Highway 112

White River (Walworth County)

White River III (Walworth)
3.12.16 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Sheridan Springs Road to Lyons

White River II (Walworth)
6.30.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Sheridan Springs Road to Wagner Park

White River I (Walworth)
5.15.10 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Sheridan Springs Road to Lyons

White River (Waushara County)

White River (Waushara)
11.1.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆
County Road YY to Czech Lane

Whitewater Creek (IA)

Whitewater Creek
6.18.18 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Whitewater Drive to Highway D61

Willow Creek

Willow Creek
8.5.17 + 8.22.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Highway 58 to Dog Hollow Road

Wisconsin River

Merrill to Wausau
…………………………………

Wisconsin River XI
5.11.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Grandfather Dam to Lokemoen Road

Wisconsin River IX
12.2.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Pine River to Texas

Mosinee to Plover
…………………………………

Wisconsin River XVIII
9.28.19 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Al Tech Park to West River Drive

Wisconsin River XVII
7.24.19 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Blue Heron Island

Wisconsin River XVI
7.23.19 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Lake DuBay Dam to County Road HH

Castle Rock Lake to Prairie Du Sac
…………………………………

Wisconsin River XIV
7.11.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Castle Rock Dam to Lyndon Station

Wisconsin River XIII
10.11.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
River Bay Road to Norway Drive

Wisconsin River XII
6.13.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Pine Island to Portage

Wisconsin River X
4.22.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Portage to Dekorra

Wisconsin River VII
8.6.11 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Wisconsin Dells to Norway Drive

Wisconsin River VI
8.15.11 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Dekorra to Whalen Bay

Wisconsin River V
10.13.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
6.1.11 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Lyndon Station to Wisconsin Dells

Prairie Du Sac to The Mississippi River
…………………………………

Lower Wisconsin Overview
Our Guide to the Lower Wisconsin Riverway

Wisconsin River XV
9.4.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Spring Green to Lone Rock

Wisconsin River VIII
6.22-6.23.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Lone Rock to Muscoda

Wisconsin River IV
9.4-9.5.10 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Prairie Du Sac to Arena

Wisconsin River III
5.29-5.31.10 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Arena to Gotham

Wisconsin River II
9.5-9.7.09 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Gotham to Boscobel

Wisconsin River I
8.22-8.24.08 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Boscobel to Wyalusing State Park

Wolf River

Wolf River III
9.6.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Lily to Hollister

Wolf River II
9.5.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
County Road A to Lily

Wolf River I
8.29.09 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Lily to Langlade

Yahara River

Yahara River Overview
Our Guide to the Yahara River

Yahara River VIII
4.19.16 | ☆ ☆
Windsor to Yahara Heights County Park

Yahara River VII
3.7.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Mud Lake to Lake Kegonsa

Yahara River VI
12.14.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Stoughton to Stebbensville Road

Yahara River V
12.13.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Lake Kegonsa to Stoughton

Yahara River IV
7.16.17 | ☆ ☆ ☆
7.22.13 | ☆ ☆
5.25.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆
Veterans Memorial Park to Windsor Road

Yahara River III
6.6.12 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Murwin County Park to Janesville

Yahara River II
7.14.13 | ☆ ☆ ☆
9.08 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Stebbensville Road to County Road H

Yahara River I
7.13.10 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
8.08 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Stebbensville Road to Murwin County Park

Yellow Creek (IL)

Yellow Creek
4.19.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Bolton Road to Krape Park

Yellow River (Taylor County)

Yellow River (Taylor)
8.31.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Miller Dam to County Road H

Yellow River (IA)

Yellow River II
5.6.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Old Sixteen Road to Highway 76

Yellow River I
5.5.14 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Highway X16 to Old Sixteen Road

Zumbro River (MN)

Zumbro River
6.1.15 | ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
Zumbro Falls to Millville


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